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Evolution of the Reading Habit

The types of books I read have evolved from year to year, generally reflecting the period of life I’m in. I tend to go through phases where I read a certain type of story for a period of time, until I find my series or genre to obsess over. People who were born readers probably all go through this same thing. Children in grade school needing to read a certain amount of books in a week to score a certain amount of points to be graded on but who also loved to read, probably stuck with the same types of books or series for the sake of enjoying it.

In elementary school, I read the “Hank the Cowdog” books for several months every week until the school library ran out of new ones for me to read. I went through the same process with “The Series of Unfortunate Events”, “The Hardy Boys”, “Goosebumps” and many Meg Cabot books.

I remember the librarian of my sixth grade class telling me that I needed to stray further than my basic mystery novels (the name of these novels escape me), written by the same author, within the same series. Of course, I didn’t listen, what did she know anyway? I thought it was funny that a school librarian would even bother mentioning this to a young student when really they were lucky that any kid likes to read anyway; but as an adult and as a more exploratory reader, I get it.

When I was in high school, I discovered Ellen Hopkins’ “Crank” series novels, and still read them religiously when a new one is written. Also, of course, I discovered all of the Nicholas Sparks novels once “The Lucky One” starring Zac Efron came to theaters. Young Adult literature a long with Romance Novels seems like a common fit for the liking of a 16-year-old high school girl.

My Fiancé, who is not a reader, has yet to let me forget that I haven’t really lived the childhood bookish world since I haven’t read a single “Harry Potter” novel, nor have I seen all of the movies. They are on my booklist to get started this year. He may be right, but just this once. Although, I can’t help but think about how a large portion of the general public (readers and non-readers) said the same thing about the “The Hunger Games” series and the “Twilight” series. Do you think these series’, my fellow readers, were worth all the hype and the money they made? -This is a topic for a later post.

I’ve also read all of the books by John Green, and I always will as he continues to write more. His novels seem to get better and better! I still indulge in Young Adult literature from time to time, especially the John Green and Ellen Hopkins books. I tend to find a lot of interesting prospects in the Young Adult Literature section of Barnes and Noble.

Currently, I’m not stuck on any author or specific series. However, I have found a particular plot sequence that is really entertaining.

Books about deceitful husbands and wives that get their payback have peaked my interest for a few months now. I pick up any novel that I learn has a storyline like this. It’s the creativity in the character of the wife that engages my attention. The secret plans the wife has for her husband are conceived from his behavior, and the deception both he and the reader are given before she is ready to light her fires are imploding means from the writer.

I think it’s respectable to enjoy the character building techniques and the creativity in the secrets both the wife and the husband keep, and of course when the wife wins, it’s all the better.

To anyone who also reads books like these, do you ever get told it’s because you’re crazy like the women in the novels?

Do you think this is a feminist point-of-view or just the female in all of us?

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Books and Their Movies (Part 1)

I recently had a conversation with my Fiancé’s mom, that triggered this conclusion- books are NOT always better than their movies.

Bear with me, fellow readers, I promise I haven’t turned to the dark-er side.

Bobby and I have been engaged for a few weeks and I have met his mom about four times throughout our relationship. When it came down to me marrying her son, her and my relationship, of course, has become more of an investment than it was before.

I have never spent so much energy trying to seem perfect to someone like I do to his mom. I balance that with worrying that I seem too uptight in front of her.

But the other day at dinner, she brought up “The Notebook” written by Nicholas Sparks and how she actually enjoyed the movie more than she did the read. When she said this, I felt the curtain drop.

Do you ever see tweets or memes on social media about bookish people stumbling on another reader and how it turns into a mini freakout moment? If you don’t follow any pages that post these, I encourage you to do so, readers.

These Ryan Gosling memes-worth following as well.

This was me in front of my soon-to-be-mother-inlaw last Friday.

I was shocked to find someone who held the same opinion as I do about this book. Most people I have brought the subject up to absolutely love the movie and have never read the book. Which, by now, readers should be used to it. I have only met two people who have read the novel, one having no useful opinion at all.

Bobby’s mom was a real source of information for this discussion. We conversed on how we both felt the movie was more emotional than the book, that the love story was more believable and heart-wrenching in the movie. I brought up to her that Allie was portrayed as an innocent virgin in the novel, but had a more spirited attitude in her relationship with Noah in the movie, and she agreed.

More on books and their movies later, take notice, this is only part one.

What is your take “The Notebook” the novel and its movie?

If you haven’t read it yet, find your copy here.