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Carrie Bradshaw

I discovered the TV form of Sex and the City when I was in college. I remember being a child when the show first aired, and how it was known for being one the most vulgar and inappropriate show on television.

Of course, fast forward more than 20 years, this is definitely no longer the case.

I have watched this show with every chance I have been given, while not having cable or an HBO subscription. Over the years, I have seen bits and pieces of the lives of Carrie, Miranda, Samantha and Charlotte.

My Fiancé and I recently renewed our HBO subscription to watch the last season of Game of Thrones (more on this later, I have lots of opinions on this just as everyone else, stay tuned). I scrolled through the list of series and there I found Sex and the City once again.

As a female in the dating world (now as one who is about to get married WOOHOO), I find the plot intriguing, but also very Hollywood and non-relatable. This is probably why it was so popular.

I have not read the published collection of essays that gave this show the female sex drive so much power.

I bring this show up not as a book review for my fellow readers, but as an influence for my fellow writers. The content compels me as a blogger, go figure.

Although it is still referenced today, I missed out on all they hype and pop culture innuendos from when it was still running. Nevertheless, I have named myself as one of the characters as women everywhere did nearly 20 years ago- I am SO Carrie.

Small disclaimer: I am not submerging into the cliche that as a blogger, I got my inspiration through Carrie Bradshaw. Well, I hope not anyway.

But it could be the idea that the content the show brings is so intriguing to me because it is all content for a writer’s column. She constantly has people coming up to her in the street raving about her column and the publicity she gets in Manhattan is every writer’s dream, isn’t it?

Carrie’s attention, however, is not the appealing element in her writer’s world. She took advantage of her surroundings and created a career out of it. As bloggers, this is our destination. Sex in Manhattan, who could imagine? Well, everyone can.

The writer’s of this show and author Candance Brushell found the prefect way to exemplify this topic, by putting it in the hands of columnist. The show would not have caught my eye otherwise, I admit. Carrie is an inspiration, after all.

So, I conclude it’s the Hollywood version of a writer that intrigues me, and not the Hollywood version of the female libido.

Let me ask you, how often do you get inspired from Television, writers?

Readers, I haven’t forgotten, books still have the best content, of course, but let’s not leave out this useful resource.

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Books and Their Movies (Part 1)

I recently had a conversation with my Fiancé’s mom, that triggered this conclusion- books are NOT always better than their movies.

Bear with me, fellow readers, I promise I haven’t turned to the dark-er side.

Bobby and I have been engaged for a few weeks and I have met his mom about four times throughout our relationship. When it came down to me marrying her son, her and my relationship, of course, has become more of an investment than it was before.

I have never spent so much energy trying to seem perfect to someone like I do to his mom. I balance that with worrying that I seem too uptight in front of her.

But the other day at dinner, she brought up “The Notebook” written by Nicholas Sparks and how she actually enjoyed the movie more than she did the read. When she said this, I felt the curtain drop.

Do you ever see tweets or memes on social media about bookish people stumbling on another reader and how it turns into a mini freakout moment? If you don’t follow any pages that post these, I encourage you to do so, readers.

These Ryan Gosling memes-worth following as well.

This was me in front of my soon-to-be-mother-inlaw last Friday.

I was shocked to find someone who held the same opinion as I do about this book. Most people I have brought the subject up to absolutely love the movie and have never read the book. Which, by now, readers should be used to it. I have only met two people who have read the novel, one having no useful opinion at all.

Bobby’s mom was a real source of information for this discussion. We conversed on how we both felt the movie was more emotional than the book, that the love story was more believable and heart-wrenching in the movie. I brought up to her that Allie was portrayed as an innocent virgin in the novel, but had a more spirited attitude in her relationship with Noah in the movie, and she agreed.

More on books and their movies later, take notice, this is only part one.

What is your take “The Notebook” the novel and its movie?

If you haven’t read it yet, find your copy here.

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The Expections of Writers (by writers)

Hello Readers!

I have read blog posts and tweets from other writers where they talk about the writing process- the good and the bad that comes out of writing their ideas. Phrases, lines, sentences, paragraphs- all that come along while trying to figure out what to say to the readers, being great and also not so great.

It’s a funny thing really. As readers, we do expect to read some decent content, don’t we? Why else would be bother opening up our Twitter app or our WordPress reader? Or even a newspaper?

Sometimes we read a post and we laugh because we read it and think ,“Hmm, I have never thought of it like that”. Sometimes we read and think ,“Now that’s interesting, I didn’t know that”. And sometimes we read and think, “That is so creative, what a genius way of putting it”. Of course these are only a few emotions we get out of reading, because as you know, there are a million different emotions in a text (read a novel for goodness sake, and we’ll talk about emotion, right?).

Hardly do I ever read a text and think it was a total waste of my time, or wonder why the writer ever bothered. But as writers, we don’t give ourselves the same credit.

We writers stress a lot about what we are saying in our work way more than we do when reading the work of others. Which makes sense, we care more about our work than how someone else’s turned out. However, we tend to forget we all sit down with our pen to paper and have the same stressors as the next writer, and the writer before us that just made that first book-deal, or reached 1000 followers on their blog.

As readers, we want to read something good. Yes, it is that generic. As writers, we just want to write something good. Again, it is that generic. But we forget that when we write. The word generic when it comes to our writing really makes us cringe because we think every word we write needs to be spectacular. But do we expect the writer of the book we are reading, or blog post we are browsing through, to have been this perfect? No way.

I’m not saying everything we come up with is great content. However, I think all ideas are relevant. I have (many times) started off writing with one topic and ended with a totally different one. Clearly, that doesn’t make for a great content piece, but everything I had said I totally think was meant for the world to read.

Usually when this happens, I break up the story into several different groups and keep the relevant parts for the post I am working on save the others for later. By doing this I end up with several different blog posts summaries that I dig deeper into later, and everything I have to say does make it online.

Since I do this often, generally I work on one project and an idea pops up that references one of the brainstorming-sessions I had before, and therefore that previous idea gets some loose ends tied-up. And sometimes I realize that the old and new project actually relate, and they get mashed together to form a more in-depth content than what I had originally pictured when I started.

Isn’t that just perfect, my fellow writers?

I have seen many quotes on Twitter and other networks from famous writers that talk about the writing process (and oh, it is definitely a process- a hard one).

One of my favorites is one written by Jessica Brody:

“Don’t be afraid to write crap. Crap makes great fertilizer.”.

Yes, it certainly does Jessica Brody. We all needed to hear it. We all experience a similar writing process, with the fails and the wins, but they are all important as we grow our stories into popular blogs and big-seller novels.

I write you this message today (also as a reminder to myself), on a day, like most, that I know you are struggling to say the right thing, to say that everything you have to say can be great with the right organization and context to support it. Yes, it really is that simple. You already know that as a reader since you read “crap” like this all the time, and keep coming back (wink).

I wrote this at 10pm on a day that I decided I needed to spit something out after not having written anything in about two weeks. You can do it too.

You have something to say, so say it, and write it so I can read it. I’ll air-clink my glass of wine with you afterwards.

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“Turtles All The Way Down” Book Review

 

Hello Readers,

I have met my new favorite book.

It’s crazy to say that since I have read hundreds, how could just one be my favorite? That’s what I thought until last night at 4am when I finished this one.

It’s Phenomenal.

John Green- Phenomenal.

It’s a story of a teenage girl, going through normal teenage girl things, and some not so normal. But what part of life is ever normal? And who is to say your life is more normal than mine, or that the grass may be greener on the other side? It never is, so it seems.

Dead family members, stress anxiety, irregular friendships, wondering what life really means- but mostly an adventure. The 2-dimensional view of this book is a few friends get together to find a missing person in order to receive the $100,000 reward. Of course, there is more to it than that, and lives become at stake for the teens who just want their father back.

From the first page of the novel:

“But I was beginning to learn that your life is a story told about you, not one that you tell.”

“Of course, you pretend to be the author. You have to. […] You think you’re the painter, but you’re the canvas.”

Already John Green has you hooked with his reversed personification. What’s more in this book is the close-up view of millennials.

I read somewhere recently where someone said, “The students of the present generation are the first to not take their cultural identity from books.” This book was clearly written for this generation of young adults, and basically is the most relate-able book I have ever encountered. As far as what I take my culture from, I don’t know. But John Green seems to get it.

Aza, the main character, suffers from anxiety, to say the least. Constantly feeling like she is trapped in her own body that will inevitably kill her one day, her mind spirals out of control with the notion that she something is hurting her that she can’t control, and she won’t ever know when the bacteria is killing her because her mind will be taken over by then, by the germ.

Aza says eventually, “Rather it hurts is kind of irrelevant.” Also, “True terror isn’t being scared; it’s not having a choice in the matter.”

As I said, this is the part that is not so normal about her teenage life, but obviously, a frequent problem young adults deal with every day. Also, something that isn’t mentioned much, especially in a fiction novel such as this one. Thank you, once again, John Green.

The novel is quite humorous. I found myself laughing in many instances, especially at the narrator’s best friend Daisy. She is strong and a light to be around. Hilarious, and afraid of nothing. A little self-centered, but caring. A great counter-part for Aza, and a real reflection of a millennial.

In chapter 6, she receives a dick-pic as fan mail for her Star Wars fan-fic blog. She states:

“I mean, how am I supposed to react to a semi-erect penis as fan mail? Am I supposed to feel intrigued?”

Aza replies:

“He probably thinks it will end in marriage. You’ll meet IRL and fall in love and someday tell your kids that it all started with a picture of a disembodied penis.”

This is so 2018 because we all know dick pics hardly ever go over very well, especially as an introduction, and is always fun to talk about with your girlfriends at an Applebee’s with a coupon in hand. It would even be more cliche if we found out the perpetrator had taken the pic with a flip phone (haha).

Daisy also compares her new boyfriend’s looks to that of a “giant baby”. And later decides she doesn’t want a relationship with him, as they are difficult, but to instead be “friends with benefits”. Of course, a total 2018 reference as we live in the world of Tinder and such high divorce rates, it seems silly to even be in a traditional relationship anymore. Or so it seems.

When Davis comes in the picture, life hardly changes much for Aza, which we hoped it would. But again, does that happen in real life? Hardly is it ever convenient. Davis is the oldest son of our missing person. His father has become missing to escape a fraud and bribery investigation, leaving his two sons behind with the estate and it’s workers to take care of them. Aza and Davis knew each other as children, and Daisy convinces Aza to reach out to him in order to find the whereabouts of his father to collect the reward. At this point, I found myself thinking this was going to be a book of revelation and closure for the characters, as they may find a valuable lesson that is unclear at this point of time, but I was wrong.

In chapter 7, I made a note saying I thought this might end up being an interesting crime novel. At this point, the book is giving a lot of insight to the trouble Davis’s father is facing, and the peer-investigation between Daisy and Aza is intriguing. After chapter 19 I wrote in the margin, “For a while, I thought this was an adventure novel, not anymore.”

The novel moves forward with the relationship between Aza and Davis, and Aza and herself. She constantly is questioning the meaning of “me”, with her therapist and her peers, but mostly with Davis. Both Aza and Davis have a dead parent, and both constantly feel misunderstood by their remaining parents. It seems as though neither of them has a close relationship with anyone, even Aza and Daisy, who are best friends, seem to not really know much about each other, and the secrets they tell are on the surface.

Once it seems that Davis and Aza are dating (use the word dating loosely), they connect on a level that only the two of them can understand and seems like a once-in-a-lifetime event for the beloved characters. I understood in chapter 13 that John Green has his unstable characters fall in love to prove their presence. That they are relevant, even when they don’t think so.

In reference to Davis, John Green inserts many quotes from inspirational authors in this novel, along with some online-journaling of Davis’s. I thought about how creative this is, to write a story inside of a story, a story that is not the author’s, but also it is. John Green is able to write in words and sentences that flow so well that it seems like it comes easily to him. I couldn’t help but be envious at this point.

Daisy’s motive of the investigation was to earn the money so she could quit he minimum-wage job and live a prosperous life as a high school student. To Aza, although she was doing it for Daisy, she wanted to help Davis and Noah more, and later learned that that was more important than a large sum of money. Our characters to tie up their loose ends by the end of the book, and I am glad for that, but also wanted to read so much more.

Our characters to tie up their loose ends by the end of the book, and I am glad for that, but also wanted to read so much more. On page 260 I thought to myself that I know there are only 20 pages left but so much more than I want to know that it would definitely need to take up more than 20 pages. Heartbreaking and unsettling as it seems, it was incredible. John Green is a master of breaking my heart and putting it back together with scotch tape, which somehow I am okay with, although it is not the same as I felt before, I am okay with it. Bravo.

Read it.

 

 

 

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Motivated Blogging

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Hey Readers!

We all experience the same struggles as writers, and especially as bloggers. Not knowing what we are doing wrong when can’t get followers- it’s hard to get noticed! Especially in the beginning.

I read this book yesterday that is basically the months we have all spent gathering information on how to blog from the internet, all rolled into one book.

Amazing right! Too bad we didn’t all find it earlier.

Although the first half of the book is teaching you how to physically start a blog (picking a domain, a hosting site and figuring out what you want to write about), there are still some amazing tips in here that help out even us who have been blogging for several months (or years)!

For instance,

  • Tips on how to make money (which I think we can all appreciate)
  • Tips on social media- how to take advantage globally!
  • Examples of what great blogs look like
  • What Google looks for with SEO
  • How to stay organized! (thank you for that one)
  • Staying motivated through all the mess we call life
  • And of course, how to get and keep followers

That last one is what we all really want, right? To BE READ. Not all of us are here for the money or to come off as know-it-alls about our subject. We all simply want to be influences on other thinking-minds and to be noticed by our peers. We keep typing away and hope that it makes a difference.

This book told me that it does, usually, make a difference.

There are 250 million blogs online, and a majority of them are abandoned after year 1. The trick is to keep moving forward because it takes time as all things do. What we are passionate about, we are definitely not the only ones, and grouping ourselves with like-minded people and their blogs can really make a difference in your view of your own purpose.

Sitting at the screen and not knowing what to write, or if people even care what you say, is just you in your own head. All the rich bloggers out there KNOW that you care, otherwise, they wouldn’t be such awesome blogs, right? HELLO. EARTH TO BLOGGERS. You are here for a reason. Tell us about it, whatever it is.

And tell me, what do you struggle with the most? Also, read this book.

“Blogging for Writers” by Robin Houghton

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Online Bookstore Launch

Hello Readers!
I have finally launched my online bookstore that I have been dying for months to get done. I sell used books online right here from my website!

Has anyone ever found inspiration in a dream they have had?
I woke up one morning after a few months of being active on my blog and really getting serious about my writing career. I dreamt that along with my blog and freelance writing aspirations, an online bookstore would add even more excitement to my new realization that I was meant to be a writer after all.

If you have read some of my previous posts, especially the ones when I was still and undergrad, you know that I have struggled with my confidence as a writer for a long time. I spent most of my college career trying to find something sensible to do with my passion for writing and books, because being a writer, and making a career out of it, seemed like a real reach for the stars.

But here I am!

And it just keeps getting better and better.

My bookstore includes several different genres for your liking, and I am adding more and more books each day.

Here is the link: https://readforthesouls.com/shop/

If you visit my website (www.readforthesouls.com), it also pops up under the menu.

Furthermore, I am taking requests for books if you have something in mind but are having trouble finding it. All of the books are $5.00 plus shipping!

Happy reading everyone!